The Time Capsules of Dover Shores

Since my last post, Dover Shores: Thanks for the Memories, many readers submitted comments about their experiences at the school.  Two time capsules are buried on the property.  One is reported to contain memorabilia from the 1980’s. I’m curious about its contents. When I think about the eighties I remember Ronald Regan was president.  Air Jordan athletic shoes were a status symbol.  TV shows like Masters of the Universe prompted action figure toys for boys. My Little Pony and Care Bears were popular with girls. The decade birthed the great grandfather of video games: Atari game systems. Remember Pacman?

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Did you know the oldest time capsule in the United States dates back to 1795? It was found in 2015 by irrigation workers under the cornerstone of the Boston Statehouse. A conservator from the Boston Museum of Art opened it. The brass box contained faded newspapers and coins dating from the 1650’s. A metal plate at the bottom identified Samuel Adams as the governor of Massachusetts at the time. The contents were displayed at the museum, and then reburied under the  cornerstone.

Why do people make time capsules? Usually they intend to communicate the present culture with future generations.  This link for creating a time capsule includes ideas about which objects make good representations of our current lives. The problem with buried capsules is too often their location is forgotten or the contents are destroyed by groundwater.

When I retired from Dover Shores, I brought home my own personal time capsule in a file folder.  I’m not sure what other teachers do with the countless cards and pictures they receive from children, but I kept some of my favorites.

 

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This thank you card was written by an anonymous student in 2005. I think somebody wanted to demonstrate their skill with the “Chinese S” design. It was a big fad at the time. Kids drew these designs all over their homework. I asked them to stop writing it on their papers, but maybe the artist thought I’d appreciate it on a thank you card.

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One time  I was out sick and a substitute took my class. When I returned to school this letter from one of the boys was on my desk. It said:  “Thank you for teaching us and I hope you feel better. Sorry for any trouble I’ve made. I hope I can help you have a great day. I’ll try to talk to some of the bad kids and I’ll tell them that you have a cold and they won’t really talk that much. I’ll try my best for my behavior and I’m sure the children will behave themselves. I’m not really used to substitute teachers because they don’t know things. But you’re always prepared. Rule #5 Be Prepared. Your one of the funnest people that are teachers. You are the nicest teacher in the world. Hope you feel better.”

And guess what? That note did make me feel better.

On May 20, 2017 Dover Shores is hosting a “Farewell to the Buildings” picnic from 11:00 to 1:00.* (new time)  The DSE community is welcome to walk the halls once again before demolition. Food can be purchased on site or families can bring their own picnic basket. Visitors are welcome to view the DSE museum of history and greet Mr. Bragg.

And by the way, if anyone has detailed information about the location of those time capsules please call the school office.

 

Remember…

Do your best and help the rest!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Author: thepoetonblueberrystreet

Debra Burton is a poet and free lance writer. She is a member of Word Weavers International.

4 thoughts on “The Time Capsules of Dover Shores”

  1. You posted one of the perks of our profession…notes and treasures from former students. I, too, have kept cards and letters from students. In fact, I keep a few in the glove box of my car. If I’m feeling blue or down, I take them out and read them at stop lights or after parking. They always, always make me smile 🙂

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